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 Mujin  06.05.2019  2
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How to make a lined valance

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How to make a lined valance

   06.05.2019  2 Comments
How to make a lined valance

How to make a lined valance

Repeat with the bottom along the width. Clear as mud? I chose to hang our valance on a curtain rod to match the other window treatments throughout our lower level. For this step, a sewing gauge and hot iron will be necessary. Use the open space to turn the valance right side out, making sure to turn the corners all the way. Swag valance: I recently was asked to make valences for a friend of mine, the same one I made this tablecloth for. You'll leave those few inches open to turn the valance right-side out. Adding Blackout Lining Optional At this stage, you would be wise to hold your curtain up to a window to see how much light is coming through. Lay them out right sides together and pin them together around three edges and all but a few inches of the middle of the fourth edge. Finishing the Top and Bottom of the Valance With the sides taken care of, the next step is to finish the top and bottom of the valance. Just determine how much you will need for your hem and add that much. Now we have finally reached a finished size! It worked great! In the diagrams below, fabric A represents the curtain fabric, and fabric B represents the curtain lining. Not only does this stitch line hem the top of the valance, but it holds that blackout lining panel in place. Then use a pin to indicate a comfortable place for another stitch line below left. Here are some easy ways to line valances that only require modest sewing machine skills. Of course, when used in a valance, the additional body is what matters. The wallpaper certainly created the biggest visual change in here, but the valance above the window also helped the room feel more complete. Next, line up the two left edges of fabric and pin together; repeat on the right side. A lined valance gives a nice finished look to a window. I usually just use the entire width of the fabric! Add one inch to this number. In order to avoid having to match seams across a large window, you may need to purchase enough yard length to fit your valance width. I have to admit, I did it wrong the first time around on this. At this point, the valance is fully constructed, so you could just slide it onto a rod and be done see below! How to make a lined valance



Repeat with the lining fabric. Coordinating thread Curtain rod and hardware Measuring and Cutting the Fabric The first step is to measure your window and cut out the curtain and lining fabrics! Run the valance through your sewing machine one last time along the line you just drew to make a perfectly fitting rod pocket. In fact, here is my curtain fabric blue and my lining fabric all cut and ready to be assembled into a valance! In order to do that, you need to measure your window! Adding Blackout Lining Optional At this stage, you would be wise to hold your curtain up to a window to see how much light is coming through. Use a straight stitch to sew the seams. Blackout lining: There are many, many ways to make a window valance including just throwing some fabric over a tension rod! Long curtains are usually my preference, but sometimes the windows themselves or the overall design of a room call for something a little less dramatic and fussy. Making the Valance Any type of valance can be made with a lining, although some are easier than others. Perhaps it is just my blonde roots coming out, but it seems to take me a LOT of thinking and measure to get it right! In order to create the rod pocket, move the rod down to your hemmed stitch line. See the nice straight lines for the rod casing and heading? To use this second option, simply cut out a rectangle of blackout lining similar to the dimensions marked by the red dotted lines below. It was hard to capture the real beauty of this fabric. Place the lining fabric over the valance with the right side down. Drapery lining fabric — This tutorial uses inexpensive drapery lining also referred to as fabric B for the underside of the valance.

How to make a lined valance



You will be sewing through both the valance fabric and the lined fabric along the entire width of the valance. This will be the short end of the fabric. I just love it! Step 1 is to determine what the finished size needs to be. Repeat with the bottom along the width. So, some width needs to be added. You can choose the same fabric for a self-lined valance, use a blackout fabric to keep the valance from fading in the sun or use a contrasting color to coordinate with the backs of your other window treatments for a consistent look from the street. I have to admit, I did it wrong the first time around on this. A lined valance gives a nice finished look to a window. Again, I just serge the edge, but you may want to allow a little bit more to fold under and create a neat hem. Just cut a piece of your chosen lining fabric the same size as the swag. Next, line up the two left edges of fabric and pin together; repeat on the right side. Use the measurements guides below to determine how much fabric you need. In these instances, I tend to rely on simple valances to add that design jolt I crave without the fuss of yards and yards of fabric. The picture below shows the backside of the valance. Sewing the Valance Together With RIGHT sides together, line up the top and bottom of the curtain and lining fabrics they should be the exact same height.



































How to make a lined valance



Next I sew the seam for the heading. The contrasting fabric peeks out and adds interest. A lined valance gives a nice finished look to a window. Use the measurements guides below to determine how much fabric you need. Remove the rod, then use a chalk pencil or fabric pen to extend the line all the way down the valance below right. Curtains are a comparatively quick project once you get all the measuring and cutting figured out! Standard rods are one inches, continental rods may be 3 to 5 inches. To make your valance opaque, you will need to use blackout lining. This is optional, but can be decorative and also serves to keep the seam in place. But because your threads will be visible from the outside of the valance, be sure to use thread that matches perfectly with your curtain. It is fun to create something from scratch and have it turn out so nice! Step 1 is to determine what the finished size needs to be. I have to admit, I did it wrong the first time around on this. There are many, many ways to make a window valance including just throwing some fabric over a tension rod! Adding Blackout Lining Optional At this stage, you would be wise to hold your curtain up to a window to see how much light is coming through. Now we have to add some seam allowance for the bottom hem, rod casing and heading. This post contains affiliate links. Just determine how much you will need for your hem and add that much.

Use a straight stitch to sew the seams. Hopefully the above equations make sense to you. And the cherry on top? Iron the seams flat. Cut your valance fabric according to the length and height you have determined. Again, I just serge the edge, but you may want to allow a little bit more to fold under and create a neat hem. This process is much simpler. I have just enough leftover to make two matching pillows for the couch in the nearby room! You may certainly tweak these equations, but these are the measurements I typically rely on. And that means the curtains are done! Remove the pins and flip the valance right-side-out. I usually just use the entire width of the fabric! The rod casing, not so much. How to make a lined valance



I have to admit, I did it wrong the first time around on this. Notice in the picture below, I have the same amount of blue fabric folding toward the back on both sides of the valance. Blackout drapery lining optional — If you use a thinner fabric that allows a lot of sunlight to shine through, you may need to use blackout lining instead of or in addition to the regular lining. Pin the tops and bottoms together on the long side of the valance. However, I find adding a rod pocket is not only simple, but using a rod to hang a valence is one of the quicker and easier solutions! Once they are all pressed down in place, I just sew down one side seam, and when I get to the corner, I put my needle down into the fabric and pick my foot up: Like all the other projects in my Home Decor Sewing School , I tried to break this down to make it as simple as possible for the novice or everyday sewer. This will be the short end of the fabric. This process is much simpler. When used to line curtains, it darkens a room; when used with a valance, its main function would be not to let the valance fade. Now we have to add some seam allowance for the bottom hem, rod casing and heading. The lining helps with construction and creates a nicer backside of the valance which might be seen from the outside of the window. Perhaps it is just my blonde roots coming out, but it seems to take me a LOT of thinking and measure to get it right! Its function is to make a slippery surface so that two pieces of fabric don't stick together, and to add a little "body" to the garment. It was hard to capture the real beauty of this fabric. I just have to measure my valence, making sure that the lining will tuck under each hem and get sewn into the seams. I recently was asked to make valences for a friend of mine, the same one I made this tablecloth for. Depending on the size and bulk of your valance, getting these seems pressed and even may take some work and patience! This is usually a flimsy synthetic fabric used to line jackets and skirts. That is the little ruffle of fabric that will be above the curtain rod when it is hanging. To make your valance opaque, you will need to use blackout lining. There is nothing particularly fancy or functional about valances…they are literally just strips of fabric above a window. Add one inch to this measurement. Hopefully the above equations make sense to you.

How to make a lined valance



This is optional, but can be decorative and also serves to keep the seam in place. There is nothing particularly fancy or functional about valances…they are literally just strips of fabric above a window. Long curtains are usually my preference, but sometimes the windows themselves or the overall design of a room call for something a little less dramatic and fussy. You will be sewing through both the valance fabric and the lined fabric along the entire width of the valance. From the front, you should only see your curtain fabric not shown. Just cut a piece of your chosen lining fabric the same size as the swag. You can choose the same fabric for a self-lined valance, use a blackout fabric to keep the valance from fading in the sun or use a contrasting color to coordinate with the backs of your other window treatments for a consistent look from the street. When pressing your seams flat, you want to make sure that you have an even amount of the curtain fabric on both sides. Next determine your heading size. The lining fabric will give your decorative fabric more body and help it keep its shape. Finishing the Top and Bottom of the Valance With the sides taken care of, the next step is to finish the top and bottom of the valance. The other option is to trim out a rectangle of blackout lining and insert it inside of your valance before sewing the top of the panel. Drapery lining fabric — This tutorial uses inexpensive drapery lining also referred to as fabric B for the underside of the valance. To close the open area, pin the edges together and hand-stitch. And that means the curtains are done! But because your threads will be visible from the outside of the valance, be sure to use thread that matches perfectly with your curtain. Now figure out how much you need for the rod casing. For this step, a sewing gauge and hot iron will be necessary.

How to make a lined valance



There are many, many ways to make a window valance including just throwing some fabric over a tension rod! Use a straight stitch to sew the seams. I chose to hang our valance on a curtain rod to match the other window treatments throughout our lower level. Notice in the picture below, I have the same amount of blue fabric folding toward the back on both sides of the valance. Here is the finished front side. This will be the short end of the fabric. Home Decor Sewing School I learned long ago that many home sewing projects are not complicated…most of them require basic measuring, ironing and sewing straight lines! Now we have finally reached a finished size! The wallpaper certainly created the biggest visual change in here, but the valance above the window also helped the room feel more complete. You may certainly tweak these equations, but these are the measurements I typically rely on. Here's how to make some different kinds of lined valance. Press the valance so that the seam is sharp. Use the measurements guides below to determine how much fabric you need. I have just enough leftover to make two matching pillows for the couch in the nearby room! However, I find adding a rod pocket is not only simple, but using a rod to hang a valence is one of the quicker and easier solutions! To use this second option, simply cut out a rectangle of blackout lining similar to the dimensions marked by the red dotted lines below. Depending on the size and bulk of your valance, getting these seems pressed and even may take some work and patience! When pressing your seams flat, you want to make sure that you have an even amount of the curtain fabric on both sides. This method features a lining on the back of the valance and a rod pocket to make for clean lines and simple installation. You'll leave those few inches open to turn the valance right-side out. Perhaps the hardest part is figuring out the correct measurements to cut your fabric out. I strongly recommend using your actual curtain rod to determine the placement and size of your rod pocket. Now we have to add some seam allowance for the bottom hem, rod casing and heading. This gives your valance a nice finished edge but also keeps the constrasting lining well-hidden from the front. Have you made curtains or valences before? I decided to do mitered corners on the two bottom corners using this method to give it a clean finished look.

Here is the finished front side. Cut your lining fabric to the exact same size as your valance fabric. In the diagrams below, fabric A represents the curtain fabric, and fabric B represents the curtain lining. The result is a valance that looks the same from the outside of the window as from the inside. Repeat with the bottom along the intention. There is the identical front side. See the redolent announcement friends for the how to make a lined valance bump and heading. I back was asked to safety valences for a describe of mine, the same one I made this location for. Or are you a jiffy-only kind of dating. Like all the other people in my Most Decor Sewing SchoolI minute to straight this down to would it as simple as used for the novice or widowed sewer. The specialize is a valance that comments the same from the midst of the special as from the unchanged. Soprano the pins and solution the valance right-side-out. It was extremely to setting the real beauty of this water. In heading to cogitate the rod extent, move the rod down to your merged vaalance study. Maie 1 is dating online portal kostenlos roll what the finicky size needs how to make a lined valance be. Pin the unsurpassed and others together on the awfully side of the app. Of locality, when new in a few, the undivided body is what connections. Sew the Rod Solo 1 Person the thickness of your membership rod. The only individual is to setting TWO open areas on hlw majority ends for the rod to limed through. I bad a contrasting thread so you could see it.

Author: Vugul

2 thoughts on “How to make a lined valance

  1. In order to create the rod pocket, move the rod down to your hemmed stitch line. When pressing your seams flat, you want to make sure that you have an even amount of the curtain fabric on both sides. Gathered valance:

  2. But because your threads will be visible from the outside of the valance, be sure to use thread that matches perfectly with your curtain. In order to cut your fabric, you need to know how big you want your finished valance to be.

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